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  #1  
Old 08-15-2008, 08:24 PM
Jamal72
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Default Ton to barrel

I would like to convert one ton of oil to a standard oil barrels .

thanks
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  #2  
Old 08-16-2008, 03:49 AM
JohnS JohnS is offline
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Default Re: Ton to barrel

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Originally Posted by Jamal72
I would like to convert one ton of oil to a standard oil barrels .

thanks
You have to know the density of the oil, because you are changing from mass to volume. Crude oil sources have different densities. In very rough terms, though a metric ton of oil is somewhere around 7 barrels. (about 1113 L, implying density of about 0.9 kg/L.
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Old 08-16-2008, 04:56 AM
Jamal72
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Default Re: Ton to barrel

What is the relation between the Mass and the volume? And what is the international exported crude oil specification?
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Old 08-16-2008, 08:47 AM
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Default Re: Ton to barrel

Density varies all over the place for crude oil. There is no "specification" although it is usually measured and is a factor in pricing.

This report gives averages by country for local production, imports and export. http://www.iea.org/textbase/work/2004/eswg/SIP9.pdf
Individual sources may lie outside these numbers, but I saw averages ranging from 0.784 to 0.93 g/cm (numerically the same range in tonnes/cubic meter). So pick a density, D. One tonne = 1000 kg.
Compute 1000/D to get volume in liters, 1000/(159*D) to get barrels.

Example: Density 0.85 g/cm (or kg/L or t/m)
1000kg / 0.85 kg/L = 1176 L
1176 L/ 159 L/barrel = 7.4 barrels per tonne.
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Old 01-16-2012, 05:26 AM
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Default Re: Ton to barrel

how can i calculate 1000metric tons to barrels
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  #6  
Old 01-16-2012, 08:52 AM
JohnS JohnS is offline
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Default Re: Ton to barrel

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how can i calculate 1000metric tons to barrels
Barrels of what? Different sized barrels are customarily used for beer, fruit, and petroleum. Whatever the product, you need density to convert between mass and volume.

If crude oil, the barrel is 42 US gallons and very nearly 159 L; however, the density can vary significantly dependent on the source of the crude. See messages above.

Divide by density to get volume, and divide by 159 L/barrel to get barrels.
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  #7  
Old 01-30-2014, 04:00 AM
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Default Re: Ton to barrel

Hi John
There are so many abbreviations when looking at the deals in crude where is a good place to start in order to define them and then to put a deal together
Your info on Barrels per ton was helpful thank you
Regards Jim
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Old 01-31-2014, 03:00 AM
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Default Re: Ton to barrel

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Hi John
There are so many abbreviations when looking at the deals in crude where is a good place to start in order to define them and then to put a deal together
Your info on Barrels per ton was helpful thank you
Regards Jim
An excellent question to which I don't have a particularly good answer.

Much of the problem is the US using a unique standard, different from the rest of the world.

The US measures volume in barrels (42 US gallons) at a standard temperature of 60 F, and measures density in odd standard called API degrees. Oil is expensive enough that the volume should be corrected for changes in temperature when it is not at 60 F and the temperature coefficient is (assumed to be) a function of the standard density at 60 F.

The rest of the world may measure either volume or mass, but if they measure volume usually multiply by density to get mass; oil is sold by the tonne (or metric ton) of 1000 kg. Density is measured in kilograms per cubic meter, and a standard of 15 C (59 F) is used. Even between 59 F and 60 F, there is a small temperature correction required, so converting between these two systems is always complex and requires use of petroleum correction tables.

Many qualitative descriptive terms are used to characterize the oil, heavy/light, sweet/sour, a name related to the source of the oil, etc. Generally the oils with desirable properties command a price premium. Light oils are better suited to refining lighter products, gasoline. Sweet (low sulfur) oils are always preferred due to cost of removing sulfur. However, these categories are a little vague and practices differ around the world.
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