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  #1  
Old 06-26-2008, 12:23 PM
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Smile Convert metric tons to cubic meters & vice versa

What is the formula (in terms that a layman can understand) for converting cubic meters into metric tons. I believe that specific gravity may be a factor. Is temperature a factor also? I am specifically interested in determining the conversion of crude degummed soy bean oil. Any thoughts?

Thank you.
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  #2  
Old 06-26-2008, 06:02 PM
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Default Re: Convert metric tons to cubic meters & vice versa

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered
What is the formula (in terms that a layman can understand) for converting cubic meters into metric tons. I believe that specific gravity may be a factor. Is temperature a factor also? I am specifically interested in determining the conversion of crude degummed soy bean oil. Any thoughts?

Thank you.
You need to know the density. Specific gravity is the ratio of something's density to the density of water (which is approximately 1 kg/L). For all materials density is a function of temperature because of thermal expansion, the volume changes. Gases and liquids are affected much more than solids. Therefore the conditions at which density is measured. Temperature is stated for liquids and solids; temperature and pressure are stated for gases.

Generally, all vegetable oils used for cooking are pretty near 0.92 kg/L (or t/m, they are numerically equal), but you may want to Google for your particular oil or demand a density measurement for a particular lot of oil.
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  #3  
Old 06-27-2008, 07:07 AM
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Smile Re: Convert metric tons to cubic meters & vice versa

John S:

Thank you very much for the excellent response. I have googled the density and it appears to generally be as follows: "at 25 C and 4 C Min. 0.9180 Max. 0.9225" Now I am trying to figure out the exact formula to use, which I believe to be: weight = volume x density. In our case, believe this would be: 1 (cubic meter) x .918 (density) = .918 metric ton. Or to go the opposite way: 1 (metric ton) / .918 (density) = 1.08932 cubic meter. Does this look correct?

The next hurdle would be determining the effect of temperature. Is there a chart or somewhere that I can look to determine density of the product at each temperature? How can I find this out? Will changes in temperature cause material changes in weight?

Thank you
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  #4  
Old 06-27-2008, 10:15 AM
JohnS JohnS is offline
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Default Re: Convert metric tons to cubic meters & vice versa

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered
John S:

Thank you very much for the excellent response. I have googled the density and it appears to generally be as follows: "at 25 C and 4 C Min. 0.9180 Max. 0.9225" Now I am trying to figure out the exact formula to use, which I believe to be: weight = volume x density. In our case, believe this would be: 1 (cubic meter) x .918 (density) = .918 metric ton. Or to go the opposite way: 1 (metric ton) / .918 (density) = 1.08932 cubic meter. Does this look correct?

The next hurdle would be determining the effect of temperature. Is there a chart or somewhere that I can look to determine density of the product at each temperature? How can I find this out? Will changes in temperature cause material changes in weight?

Thank you
You have them right, but my recommendation is always keep the units attached to the number and analyze the units. If you are doing it right, the unwanted units will cancel out. If you are doing it wrong, they will turn into a big mess, Taking the middle of the range 0.92 t/m,

1 m x 0.92 t/m = 0.92 t
1 t x 1 m/0.92 t = 1.087 m

For petroleum products, API prints (and sells) detailed tables of density correction. I've not seen them for vegetable oils.

You might be able to find (Google) a volumetric coefficient of thermal expansion. It will be the decimal fraction change in volume per degree. The weight is unchanged, but the volume increases with temperature, generally (water is an exception below 4 C). Because the volume increases, the density decreases. If you have access to a library with a copy of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry & Physics, it has a table for some liquids, not sure about soy oil.
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  #5  
Old 06-27-2008, 11:27 AM
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Smile Re: Convert metric tons to cubic meters & vice versa

JohnS:

Thank you very much for your help. I will see if I can find the items you suggested.
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  #6  
Old 06-27-2008, 03:57 PM
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Default Re: Convert metric tons to cubic meters & vice versa

While I found this in an article on soy oil, the same paragraph appears in the corresponding article for several vegetable oils, so it is a generic figure for vegetable oils. However, it would be a good first-order correction.

http://www.tis-gdv.de/tis_e/ware/oel...oja.htm#dichte
Quote:
All fats and oils have a particular density (approx. 0.9 g/cm3). With a rise in temperature, however, density diminishes, thereby leading at the same time to an increase in volume. This behavior is described by the coefficient of cubic expansion and is known as thermal dilatation.

The coefficient of cubic expansion amounts to: g = approx. 0.000746C-1

As a rule of thumb, oils may be expected to increase in volume by 1% of their total volume for each 14C temperature increase.
If the temperature changes by delta_T degrees from that at which density is stated, the density will change to density/(1 +delta_T*0.000746).

If temperature increase 14 degrees, density will decrease to density/1.01.
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  #7  
Old 01-23-2010, 04:39 AM
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Default Re: Convert metric tons to cubic meters & vice versa

Can help me.. what si the formula calculation volume of cargo inyard ? can posible to calculate the at yard?
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  #8  
Old 07-23-2010, 06:45 PM
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Default Re: Convert metric tons to cubic meters & vice versa

One cubic metre is equal to howmany metric tonnes?
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  #9  
Old 02-16-2011, 08:29 AM
stalino55
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Unhappy Re: Convert metric tons to cubic meters & vice versa

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One cubic metre is equal to howmany metric tonnes?
Hey guys,
What is the formula to use to convert following?
one metric ton of fabricated steel to cubic meter?
This is to be used for ocean freight shipping purposes.
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  #10  
Old 02-16-2011, 09:48 AM
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Default Re: Convert metric tons to cubic meters & vice versa

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Originally Posted by stalino55 View Post
Hey guys,
What is the formula to use to convert following?
one metric ton of fabricated steel to cubic meter?
This is to be used for ocean freight shipping purposes.
A solid rectangular block, or rectangular pieces that stack with no air space between, 7.9 t/m.

If the frabricated shapes stack with a lot of airspace between, very hard to analyze. You have to determine how much of the stack volume is actually steel vs air, then use the above figure on the percentage which is steel.
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