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  #1  
Old 05-02-2006, 08:29 AM
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Default Liquid Oxygen Conversion

I have liquid O2 in tanks. We measure it by inches. The co. charges us by the ccf. How do I convert inches into ccf?
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Old 05-02-2006, 04:10 PM
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Default Re: Liquid Oxygen Conversion

The inches used is most likely inches as a unit of pressure. Such as inch of water, inch of air, inch of mercury, etc.

Originally it was the height of a column of (mercury or water or air) that excerted the same pressure as the atmosphere. Today though it is generally just standardized to a specific value as temperature changes the original definition.

Now back to your original question. How do you convert pressure to volume. I don't know of any way to do that. Though it feels like it would be possible.
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Old 05-02-2006, 09:19 PM
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Default Re: Liquid Oxygen Conversion

Does the "inches" measurement tell you when to get the tank refilled? If this is the case, it could be the depth of the liquid oxygen in the tank. You could make some attempt to work out the volume of the tank, and draw a correlation between volume and depth. (I don't know what ccf stands for sorry, I'm assuming it is a volume measurement).

A note about pressure: When the tank has just been filled, the pressure will be quite low, as all you are measuring is the pressure in the gas space above the liquid. When the tank is nearly empty, the gas pressure can be quite high, due to plenty of gas in the gas space above the liquid. ALSO, the pressure can be quite high when the tank is nearly full, and it can be quite low when the tank is nearly empty.
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Old 05-02-2006, 11:56 PM
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Default Re: Liquid Oxygen Conversion

CCF stands for hundred cubic feet. The C being the Roman Numeral C for 100. It is fairly common for utility companies (such as the gas company) in the U.S. to use this unit, but seldom seen elsewhere.
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Old 07-19-2006, 05:14 AM
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Default Re: Liquid Oxygen Conversion

i work for a gas supplier. all liquid gas deliveries are measured in either gallons of liquid, or cubic feet. most often, they are billed to you by cubic feet.

as for the inch to volume conversion, it is different depending on the size tank you have. a company called MVE currently manufactures the bulk tanks, and they have charts that give you the conversion for each inch increment.

for instance, in a 3000 gallon oxygen tank, the average inch is approx equal to 1,902 cu ft.
keep in mind this is an average. an inch of water at the bottom of the tank is much different than an inch at the top due to the construction of the bulk tank itself.

I would contact your supplier. They should be able to supply you with the conversion chart for your tank.
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Old 10-05-2007, 10:51 AM
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Default Re: Liquid Oxygen Conversion

Pressure and volume can be interconverted using some laws of chemistry, such as the Ideal Gas Law and Van der Waals equation, but using these would probably not provide the most accurate or practical solution for your situation.

(visit Wikipedia for explanation)
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Old 10-07-2007, 01:33 PM
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Default Re: Liquid Oxygen Conversion

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered
Pressure and volume can be interconverted using some laws of chemistry, such as the Ideal Gas Law and Van der Waals equation, but using these would probably not provide the most accurate or practical solution for your situation.

(visit Wikipedia for explanation)
Liquids of any description are not obeying the ideal gas law.
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Old 11-07-2007, 11:47 AM
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Default Re: Liquid Oxygen Conversion

Question, How many liters are in a lb of oxygen?
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Old 12-04-2007, 08:33 AM
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Default Re: Liquid Oxygen Conversion

We have tanks that are 180Liters that weigh 293 lbs.
My question is if I run 70L/min how long will one tank last?
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Old 12-04-2007, 08:21 PM
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Default Re: Liquid Oxygen Conversion

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered
We have tanks that are 180Liters that weigh 293 lbs.
My question is if I run 70L/min how long will one tank last?
180/70 = 2.57minutes, or 2minutes and 34seconds. the 293 pounds is a red herring.
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