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  #1  
Old 05-13-2006, 09:00 AM
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Default KN/m2 ???

How do i work out KN/m2, can anyone help???

Thanks.

Dave.
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  #2  
Old 05-14-2006, 03:31 PM
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Default Re: KN/m2 ???

Can you provide more information as to what you are trying to do?

You need to convert that to something else, or convert something else to that?
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Old 07-22-2007, 09:34 AM
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Question Re: KN/m2 ???

what does Kn/m2 mean in context to the weight of a dead load....i.e. a house?
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Old 07-22-2007, 11:03 AM
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Default Re: KN/m2 ???

It's a unit of pressure, force per area. For a weight such as a house it would be how much weight over a specific area.

kN = kilonewton, a unit of force.
m2 = m = square meter, a unit of area

kN/m = kilonewton/square meter

You can convert kilonewtons to pounds-force or kilograms-force, if that will make it easier to understand.
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Old 10-16-2007, 06:11 AM
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Question Re: KN/m2 ???

so if is stated that the floor can support 100KN/m2, it means it can handle a average weight of 100kg per m2?
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  #6  
Old 10-17-2007, 09:04 PM
Roy Nakatsuka
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Default Re: KN/m2 ???

Unfortunately, it's not quite that simple.

One newton is approximately equal to one-tenth of a kilogram (0.1 kg). Since the floor you're describing can support 100 kN/m2, that's 100,000 N/m2, or 10,000 kg/m2. So the floor would be 100 times stronger than you thought.

Hope that makes you feel safer!
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Old 10-17-2007, 10:31 PM
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Default Re: KN/m2 ???

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roy Nakatsuka
Unfortunately, it's not quite that simple.

One newton is approximately equal to one-tenth of a kilogram (0.1 kg). Since the floor you're describing can support 100 kN/m2, that's 100,000 N/m2, or 10,000 kg/m2. So the floor would be 100 times stronger than you thought.

Hope that makes you feel safer!
Opps, 1 newton = 9.8 kg (force)

This is derived by the weight in kilograms, times the force of gravity. I learned that here, from a poster called.... um....

and then we've been using it all the time at work, since.
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  #8  
Old 10-18-2007, 12:42 AM
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Default Re: KN/m2 ???

Surely you're joking, Mrs X! *

But I don't know your sense of humor well enough to be sure. On the chance that you are serious, please read the last line of Post #9 in the following thread, to which I believe you are referring--
http://forum.onlineconversion.com/showthread.php?t=5091
"To convert from kilogram-force (kgf) to newton (N) Multiply by 9.80665"
In equation form, that statement says:
1 kgf = 9.80665 N
Or, inverting,
1 N = 1/9.80665 kgf = 0.101972 kgf
Now, on the chance that you really were serious, I will let you claim that you were joking, as even Einstein was known to have made mistakes, and your good works in this forum have surely earned you many free passes from all....

But please, please assure me that you haven't really been using your stated formula at work!?

Oh, and one more item of important business--To both you and janiceruth, my sincere apologies for bulldozing you in that earlier thread, but I was terribly concerned about that poor school student picking up an incorrect answer and remembering it for the rest of his/her life! And then having other people also read it without correction. We wouldn't want the same thing to happen in the current thread either, now would we?

So, I repeat my assertion:
1 N = 0.1 kg (approximately)
and I claim that this is equivalent to what I posted in that earlier thread.


* In case you didn't catch the pun in my greeting, it comes from the title of a delightful book about... a physicist! Imagine that!
http://www.amazon.com/Surely-Feynman.../dp/0393316041
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  #9  
Old 10-18-2007, 09:38 AM
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Default Re: KN/m2 ???

Oh duh! We discussed it, and still I got it wrong! I should stick to chemistry, and not worry about physics.

1kg gives 9.8 Newtons. Most people just multiply weight (in kg) by 10 to get newtons.
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  #10  
Old 10-19-2007, 05:47 AM
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Default Re: KN/m2 ???

Dear Mrs X,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs X
1kg gives 9.8 Newtons. Most people just multiply weight (in kg) by 10 to get newtons.
That's an excellent summary you've provided, which will be useful to everyone. I know that you actually understand the concepts very well.

The anecdotes below at another website should certainly remind you of the value of the kind of help you provide to others in this forum!

Quote:
I am a Physics teacher at The International School of Bucharest.... It happened in my class..
'we were talking about the acceleration of free-fall. I wrote a 'g' letter on the board, and asked 'How can we measure this constant? Do you have any idea?' One of them stood up, came to the board, and measured the length of the 'g' letter on the board, and said 'by a ruler, teacher!'
Quote:
Early morning Physics class filled with slightly dazed freshmen. Eager beaver post-doc teaching the class asks "The wavelength of the Sodium yellow line. What is it? You there!"

Fortunately he has his eagle eye on the guy next to me, who mutters: oh ****, and replies "A hundred and one?"

"Hah!" says the postdoc "A hundred and one what?"

"Um, a hundred and one, point two?"
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