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  #1  
Old 05-01-2007, 09:59 AM
cajunbred
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Question ppm to mg/L conversion

I am trying to convert the following ppm to mg/L.

(1,667.4 ppm with a Density of 1.0733) and (1.043.7 ppm with a density of 1.0975 ). I am multipying the density by the ppm to achieve my mg/L number? What is the correct formulation or even better, the answer to the problems above? Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 05-02-2007, 01:21 AM
Mrs X Mrs X is offline
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Default Re: ppm to mg/L conversion

Hi, ppm IS mg per liter.
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Old 09-23-2007, 02:37 AM
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Wink Re: ppm to mg/L conversion

Quote:
Originally Posted by cajunbred
I am trying to convert the following ppm to mg/L.
Inorder to conversion note below:

((molecular weight)/22400)*ppm=mg/l
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  #4  
Old 10-19-2007, 05:03 PM
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Default mg/L conversion

how do you convert mg/L P to mg/L PO4? why are results generally reported as mg/L P?
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Old 10-23-2007, 06:44 PM
Mrs X Mrs X is offline
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Default Re: mg/L conversion

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered
how do you convert mg/L P to mg/L PO4? why are results generally reported as mg/L P?
Hi, the molar mass (Mr) of phosphate is 31 + 4 x 16 = 95g/mol, the Mr of phosphorus is 31g/mol.

To convert ppm P to ppm PO4, multiply by 95/31.

For example if you have 50mg/L P, in a phosphate solution, this is the same as 50 x 95/31 = 153mg/L PO4.

However, PO4(3-) doesn't exist on its own, it would be H3PO4 for example, or Na3PO4.12H2O. Also, it might be present as phosphite, rather than phosphate, or some other ion mixture.

Hope this helps.
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Old 10-23-2007, 06:45 PM
Mrs X Mrs X is offline
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Default Re: ppm to mg/L conversion

You probably realise anyway, but ppm and mg/L are the same thing when you are talking about solutions.
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  #7  
Old 10-27-2009, 02:55 PM
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Exclamation Re: ppm to mg/L conversion

Mrs. X
ppm is not necessarily mg/L. It IS mg/kg.
If the solvent is water (1L of water weighs 1 Kg), then mg/L = ppm
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Old 10-27-2009, 05:46 PM
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Default Re: ppm to mg/L conversion

The convention is, and always has been, that if you are talking about wet chemistry, concentrations are reported as w/v (weight for volume) unless otherwise stated.

(JohnS HATES this, and wants to have concentrations stated as mg/L or mg/kg. He will delighted to have converted you.)
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  #9  
Old 10-28-2009, 07:18 AM
JohnS JohnS is offline
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Default Re: ppm to mg/L conversion

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs X View Post
The convention is, and always has been, that if you are talking about wet chemistry, concentrations are reported as w/v (weight for volume) unless otherwise stated.

(JohnS HATES this, and wants to have concentrations stated as mg/L or mg/kg. He will delighted to have converted you.)
HATE is a little strong but I do find ppm ambiguous. By the time you add qualifiers for weight/weight, weight/volume, moles/moles, volume/volume, it is just as easy to use real units.

I acknowledge your use in laboratory chemistry, but industrial chemicals (and chemical engineering) are usually on a weight/weight basis.
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Old 03-20-2010, 11:57 AM
Jmusfreshest Jmusfreshest is offline
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Default Re: ppm to mg/L conversion

Acceptable limit for nitrate, often found in well water in agricultural areas is 10ppm. If a water sample is found to contain 350 mg/L, does it meet the acceptable limit? Show a calculation to support your answer. Show the steps of getting to the answer.
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