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Old 03-26-2010, 12:34 PM
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Default Convert pcf to psi

Please help me figure this out:
Situation: Design for 30 pcf hydraulic pressure on a basement wall.
Question: How much psi would a material have to have to resist this?
In other words, if this wall was loaded to 30 pcf, then what density of material should be on the unloaded side.?
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Old 03-26-2010, 01:01 PM
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Default Re: Convert pcf to psi

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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Please help me figure this out:
Situation: Design for 30 pcf hydraulic pressure on a basement wall.
Question: How much psi would a material have to have to resist this?
In other words, if this wall was loaded to 30 pcf, then what density of material should be on the unloaded side.?
I don't understand how hydraulic pressure would be expressed as pounds per cubic foot. It would seem to me that it like any pressure has to be force per unit of area, not volume.

The wall has to be strong enough to withstand the pressure. I don't think it is feasible to backfill the basement to relieve the pressure.

However, it is probably fair to say you need help from someone who knows a LOT more about foundation repair than I do.
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Old 03-27-2010, 11:17 AM
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Default Re: Convert pcf to psi

I will explain the situation more completely, since I don't understand either. The basement is a panel wall which is designed for "30 lb./cu. ft. hydraulic pressure" from the manufacturer's manual. The design is to connect the panel to the footing in the usual manner with anchor bolts. This is the main connection. As added protection, the design calls for a treated 2x4 to be placed between the slab on the inside of the wall and the panel wall. I do not like this from a thermal break standpoint and want to replace the 2x4 with 2" of foam. Foam comes in various densities from 25 lbs./ sq/ ft to 100 lbs/sq/ft. Guess which is cheaper? So to be very conservative, how do you make the conversion from 30 pcf to ?psf. If this still does not make sense to you, because of the hydraulic pressure being expressed in the wrong units, then I need to know that as well and it's back to the manufacturer....
Thank you for your help.
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Old 03-27-2010, 12:38 PM
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Default Re: Convert pcf to psi

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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I will explain the situation more completely, since I don't understand either. The basement is a panel wall which is designed for "30 lb./cu. ft. hydraulic pressure" from the manufacturer's manual. The design is to connect the panel to the footing in the usual manner with anchor bolts. This is the main connection. As added protection, the design calls for a treated 2x4 to be placed between the slab on the inside of the wall and the panel wall. I do not like this from a thermal break standpoint and want to replace the 2x4 with 2" of foam. Foam comes in various densities from 25 lbs./ sq/ ft to 100 lbs/sq/ft. Guess which is cheaper? So to be very conservative, how do you make the conversion from 30 pcf to ?psf. If this still does not make sense to you, because of the hydraulic pressure being expressed in the wrong units, then I need to know that as well and it's back to the manufacturer....
Thank you for your help.
It does not make sense to me.

I wonder if the 30 pcf is simply the density of the material. The weight should be borne by the footer, however, I assume it needs some lateral support from the concrete wall.

It sounds like this is a decorative panel, providing no real structural support. With a gap between it and the concrete wall, I don't see how it is exposed to any hydraulic pressure at all.

You probably need clarification from the manufacturer. At any rate, I am too confused by it to offer any help.
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